.356 Winchester

 
.356 Winchester
 
 

Introduced in 1982 in an equally new variant of the Model 94 Winchester called Angle Eject, the .356's only claim to fame is that it was once available in more than two rifles while its .307 Winchestermate has never been available in more than one. When we consider that it is far more effective on big game than the .30-30 Winchesterand .35 Remingtonand will do about anything the .348 Winchesterand .358 Winchester will do, the .356's sad tale of woe is difficult to explain. But then, when we consider what happened to the .348and .358, the water clears up considerably. In 1987, only five years after its introduction, U.S. Repeating Arms ceased production of the Model 94 carbines in .356 Winchester but brought it back for another try in 1988. Hopefully, it's reintroduction in the Model 94 was prompted by hunter demand. Olin engineers who developed the .356 Winchester have cautioned against loading the cartridge with roundnose bullets. This leaves us with the 180 and 220grain Speerbullets, both of flatnose form. Excellent powders for the .356 Winchester are H335, H4895, IMR-4064, and W-748. 

This text is based on information from “Cartridges of the World”, Hodgdon reloading manual, the cartridge designer and/or own resources.

   
Bullet weight: Bullet name: Powder:  

 
Not yet verified user loads  
ID: Bullet weight: Bullet name: Powder:  
250 grs
kodiak
IMR 4064
220 grs
Speer 220gr.F.N.
H4895
200 grs
Sierra R/N
IMR4198
200 grs
hornady
Imr-4320
220 grs
220 Speer
H322
200 grs
Hornady FTX
H4198